If the Supreme Court ultimately takes the case and overturns the pillar, this could have a widespread impact on out-of-pocket health care costs, including costs for the HIV-prevention pill, known as PrEP.

A federal appeals court on Friday found unconstitutional a key component of the Affordable Care Act that grants a health task force the effective authority to require that insurers both cover an array of preventive health interventions and screenings and refrain from imposing out-of-pocket costs for them.

The lawsuit centered on the objections of a coalition of small businesses in Texas to the requirement that they cover a drug for HIV prevention, known as PrEP, in their employee health plans. The appeals court did not, however, overturn the related ACA pillar; the practical, immediate impacts of its ruling apply narrowly to the plaintiffs in this case.

Legal experts expect that the case, Braidwood v. Becerra, will ultimately advance to the Supreme Court, given that it poses crucial questions about the constitutionality of the health task force’s effective authority and that of other federal health bodies. Additionally, the current court has demonstrated interest in cases concerning the delegation of congressional authority to agencies and experts.

  • partial_accumen@lemmy.world
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    22 days ago

    The lawsuit centered on the objections of a coalition of small businesses

    One business and a few individuals apparently.

    From another source:

    The ruling from U.S. District Judge Reed O’Connor focuses on claims from Braidwood Management, a Christian for-profit corporation owned by Steven Hotze, that its rights were violated by the mandate under the Religious Freedom Restoration Act.

    And that complaint is:

    But Hotze, whose company provides health insurance to about 70 employees, argued that offering coverage for PrEP drugs encouraged “homosexual behavior” and violated “his religious beliefs by making him complicit in encouraging those behaviors.”

    So some old fashion christian homophobic and even heterosexual shaming is the basis for this law suit.

  • halcyoncmdr@lemmy.world
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    22 days ago

    Obamacare was the compromise. Remove it and we’ll just work that much harder to get Medicare for All and join the rest of the developed world with universal access to healthcare and not destroying your financial future.

    • disguy_ovahea@lemmy.world
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      22 days ago

      Repealing the ACA without replacement would result in the immediate loss of healthcare for 45 million Americans. That’s a wildly irresponsible proposal.

      Biden tried applying the same pressure by repealing Title 42 without restricting immigration for almost two years, while pressuring Congress to do their job and pass immigration reform. They failed, and now he has to return to restricting entry due to lack of state housing and federal budget.

      Republicans don’t care about people as much as they care about winning.

    • CoggyMcFee@lemmy.world
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      22 days ago

      Do you have any idea how long it took to make any kind of healthcare reform happen when we finally got the ACA? If we just remove it, that’s not going to make everyone “work that much harder to get Medicare for All”, it will set us back arguing over even the things that the ACA got us. Suddenly, denying coverage for pre-existing conditions is back on the table.

      And what the hell would Democrats say to the tens of millions of people who lose their health coverage when they vote to repeal the ACA? “Don’t worry, this is going to make things so desperate that we’ll all feel really determined to pass universal healthcare!”

      It makes absolutely no sense what you’re saying!

      • corsicanguppy@lemmy.ca
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        22 days ago

        Do you have any idea how long it took to make any kind of healthcare reform happen when we finally got the ACA?

        Considering the Dems have had control of the house and senate only 4 of the last 44 years, I’d say it’s been 40 of the last 44 years we’ve gotten nowhere.

      • halcyoncmdr@lemmy.world
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        22 days ago

        Oh I know, and I know the ACA was essentially the Republican plan from the beginning.

        I also know there is absolutely jack shit any of us can do to make the Supreme Court not throw shit out just because they want to and find a flimsy justification for it. Congress would have to do their job and hold them accountable, and that’s not going to happen.

        The only way people will actually demand something real is if this happens and millions lose access to their healthcare, with their new options increasing in price dramatically just like it used to be. If they can even get insured.

        The ACA was originally implemented slowly and as such the average person never saw a big difference before and after. The “big” issues were from shit plans that didn’t do anything for people anyway but they paid for it thinking they had coverage. We’re now post-COVID and there are millions of Americans with long term health issues stemming from that period. I’m sure insurance companies would put that right at the top of their list to disqualify coverage. Denying coverage would not be gradual and will be noticed.

  • zzz711@lemmy.ml
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    22 days ago

    I am shocked that the 5th circuit would rule this way. Completely and utterly shocked.

  • ryathal@sh.itjust.works
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    22 days ago

    Wouldn’t be surprised if this ends up with basically the same ruling as birth control but with a test attached so they don’t have to keep ruling on each drug.